Winners Abound for RideShare Delaware

In February we ran our Frozen February Commute contest where one lucky participant that recorded five days of clean commuting won $50 in giftcards. Our lucky winner was….

Denise Husband! Denise has been a member of RideShare Delaware since 2012. She either uses bus riding or carpooling to get to her Job in Dover from her home in Wilmington, making for a clean commute trip of over 100 miles each day!

Ride.Record. Reward! Winners

Larry Kraines was one of our February Winners for Ride. Record. Reward! Larry clean commutes from his home in Pennsylvania to his job in Newark, Delaware, racking up 20 clean commute miles every day.

James Duffus was our other winner for February. James commutes from his home in Newark to his job downtown Wilmington. We thank James for his commitment to clean commuting (no photo available).

 

Lastly, Lisa Washington won a $25 dollar gift card for completing our year end RideShare Delaware Survey.

We thank all our participants and look forward to giving you more ways to win during the year!

DART, Rideshare Spread News at 87ers Game

DART and RidesShare Delaware were invited by the Delaware 87ers on Feb. 25 to provide a table with transit information at their home game at the Bob Carpenter Center on the University of Delaware Campus. There were several individuals, who visited our table, interested in regular and intercounty bus service, SEPTA Regional Rail, paratransit and RideShare Delaware. This invitation was offered through a trade agreement between DART and the Delaware 87ers from October 2016 to April 2017. DART provided a bus wrap on an intercounty bus between Wilmington and Dover to the Delaware 87ers for advertisement as well as two bus shelters in northern New Castle County. As a result, DART received the opportunity to participate as sponsor of the Delaware 87ers for the 2016-2017 season through advertising and other trade benefits.

Partner Spotlight – Christiana Care Health System

Christiana Care has been a member of RideShare Delaware since 2003 and a Gold Partner since June 2010. They are the largest private employer in Delaware with 11,000 employees located in various campuses throughout the state. RideShare Delaware is able to enhance their employee benefits with their to-and-from work transportation program.

Our partnership works with representatives throughout the Christian Care organization from new employee orientation, customer/administrative services, and public safety.

Current activities we coordinate:

  • Participation in the bi-weekly new employee orientations “Vital Needs Fair”
  • Transportation Day events with larger sites such as West End Café located at Christiana Care Hospital, Wilmington Hospital, and One Reads Way
  • A resource for DART First State services
  • Preferred Carpool Parking Program

 

Other transportation benefits Christiana Care offers:

  • A shuttle service operating from 6 a.m. – 11 p.m. each day, traveling between Wilmington and Christiana Hospitals
  • for use by employees, patients, and visitors
  • On site DART bus shelter station
  • Electric charging stations for employees (6 at Christiana Hospital and 2 at Wilmington Hospital).
  • Access to Bike Racks and on-site shower facilities

 

RideShare Delaware recognizes Christiana Care for their outstanding commitment to employee health and wellness and thanks them for their partnership to make the State of Delaware a cleaner environment.

RideShare Delaware looks forward to working with and strengthening our partnership with Christiana Care Health System throughout Delaware by exploring and implementing new benefit options.

Partner Spotlight – Delaware National Guard

The Delaware National Guard has been a member of RideShare Delaware since December 2008. Throughout the years, RideShare Delaware and the Delaware National Guard have built their partnership through the continued presence of RideShare and the free benefits that RideShare offers the men and women of the DE National Guard. Just this past December, the Delaware National Guard moved up the rank of Bronze RideShare Partner to a Gold RideShare Partner, which is the highest partnership level.  The importance of this Gold Partnership Level shows that the Delaware National Guard is committed to offering and encouraging clean commute transportation options for the men and women who serve the National Guard. Danielle Martin, RideShare’s Onsite Transportation Coordinator and the Mass Transit Coordinator, has been a pivotal initiator of building the relationship between RideShare and the DE National Guard. Several initiatives that boosted the DE National Guard RideShare partnership are as follows:

– Encouraging and hosting Vanpool Formations

– RideShare and VRide presentations twice a year

– RideShare attends the DE National Guard Wellness Fair for all employees

– Monthly RideShare presentations during the In-Processing Trainings

– Promoting commute options through postings, emails, flyers

– Federal employees and state employees receive a transit subsidiary

The Delaware National Guard also received the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification for 2015 at the Major Joseph R. “Beau” Biden III National Guard/Reserve Center. The LEED Certification is one of the most popular green building certification programs used worldwide, that requires buildings to meet a set of rating systems that aim to make the building environmentally responsible and efficient.

RideShare Delaware wants to thank the DE National Guard for their continued and active support in their role for helping to make the State of Delaware a cleaner environment. Also, by offering the many free benefits that RideShare Delaware offers, the National Guard represents a strong commitment to the transportation needs of the men and women who travel to the different locations throughout Delaware. We at RideShare Delaware look forward to continuing our partnership with the Delaware National Guard through 2017.

Also in 2015 the Delaware National Guard celebrated it’s 361st year!

Happy 361st Birthday to the Delaware National Guard! We thank the National Guard, the citizen soldiers, and airmen for your service and protection!

Thankful Commuter Contest Winner!

In November, we ran our annual Thankful Commuter Contest to see why our registrants are thankful for going green and saving green. Our winner this year was Scott Christensen, who commutes to his job at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds with 5 other coworkers via vanpool.  On average, each person’s commute would be approximately 37 miles each way from their homes in Delaware to the Proving Grounds in Maryland.  This one vanpool takes 5 cars and 444 vehicular miles off the road every day!  When asked why they choose to vanpool, Scott and his coworkers cited saving money on gas, being able to live in Delaware and enjoy its lower cost of living, and taking cars off the road.  We applaud Scott and his coworkers for their commitment to clean commuting and look forward to having them continue their commitment in 2017.  We would also like to individually recognize Scott for his continued dedication to clean commuting.  He was one of the first registrants in our program and for several years has made it a priority to vanpool to work, even if it meant he had to switch vanpools and carpool to the pickup location during that time.  Great job all around!

Scott Christensen and his coworkers - clean commuters
Scott Christensen and his coworkers – Clean Commuters!!

Meet our July Ride. Record. Reward! Winners

WinnerJul1

Say hello to Deb! Deb is an avid clean commuter and tries to clean commute anyway possible. Currently  she lives and works in the Newark area  which enables her to frequently bike to her job at the University of Delaware. On days she can’t ride her bike in, she carpools into work still saving her money  while still clean commuting. Your commitment to clean commuting is an inspiration Deb!

 

WinnerJuly2

Doug  carpools with our winner from last month to their work at Siemens in Glasgow. Even though his ride lives  in Pennsylvania they both meet at a central location near Wilmington and share their ride to work every day. We applaud Doug’s effort of clean commuting to work and are proud to highlight his commitment to clean commuting.

Sussex Fixed Route Service Change and Pilot Flex Services Approved for November

Delaware Transit Corporation (DTC) has announced the approval Sussex County Fixed route service changes, as well as new, pilot Flex services that will become effective on Monday, November 10, 2014.

The changes include:

Route 212 – Service between Georgetown, Bridgeville, Seaford and Laurel will be extended to Delmar. The Seaford/Laurel/Delmar Shuttle will be discontinued. Route 212 will operate weekdays on an hourly schedule between 5:35 AM and 9:35 PM, offering connections to Routes 206, 303 and three new flex routes.

Seaford/Laurel/Delmar Shuttle (including Saturday Service) – The Shuttle will be discontinued, although its Monday through Friday service will be replaced by the extended Route 212 service to Delmar.

NEW Pilot Flex Services – Three routes will operate, one in Georgetown (901F), another between Georgetown and Millsboro (902F), and a third in Seaford (903F), providing weekday, hourly service from 6 AM to 7 PM. Flex routes offer the ability to deviate off a designated route within a one mile corridor by reservation (same day reservations available). The fare is the fixed route base fare, plus $1 per deviation. The service offers connections to Routes 206, 212, 303, as well as transfers between the Georgetown flex routes.

As an introductory promotion for the new Flex services, the base fare will be FREE until January 2015; $1 fare per deviation still applies.

The Delaware Transit Corporation, a subsidiary of the Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT), operates DART First State. For information on fixed route bus services statewide, please call 1-800-652-DART or visit www.DartFirstState.com.

Earth Day Photo Contest

RideShare Delaware is excited to honor Earth Day throughout the month of April, what better way to celebrate than with a fun giveaway?!

 Earth Day 2014 Logo

From now through April 25, we want to see how you ride!

Take a photo of/on your clean commute (Carpool, Vanpool, Transit, Telework, Walk or Bike) and post it to our Facebook (facebook.com/rideshareDE), tweet us (@rideshareDE), or email your photo to general@ridesharedelaware.org to be entered to win!

One entry per person, 2 winners will be drawn at random on April 28th.

1st prize: $50 gift card (Your choice—Target, Wawa or Walmart)

2nd prize:  $25 gift card (Your choice—Target, Wawa or Walmart)

 

Spring is a wonderful time to give alternate commuting to work a try!

 If you need to make updates to your clean commuter profile, please login here.

As Gas Prices Fluctuate, Support for Mass Transit Rises – From The Atlantic Cities

As Gas Prices Fluctuate, Support for Mass Transit Rises

Americans made nearly 10.7 billion trips on public transit in 2013, the country’s highest ridership point in more than half a century. The mark is largely the result of increased investments: bigger systems in some cities, more off-peak service in others. We can and should discuss whether the public costs of these projects matched the ridership return, but the trend is at a minimum in the right direction.

At the end of the day, though, improving trains and buses alone can only attract so many riders. The bigger changes in travel mode won’t occur until local governments pair such transit incentives with automobile disincentives. The latter involves removing the social discounts that encourage driving — chief among them, an artificially low gas tax that doesn’t cover the cost of our roads.

We catch a glimpse of this potential shift from road to rail whenever gas prices spike. Bradley Lane of the University of Texas at El Paso recently showed that a 10 percent increase in fuel cost led to bumps of 4 percent in bus ridership and 8 percent on rail. That trend even held true in heavily car-reliant cities with traditionally poor transit systems, like Omaha, Des Moines, Kansas City, and Indianapolis (below, the bus bumps):

But gas prices as posted in big numbers high above a filling station aren’t the only thing with the power to influence our perceptions about the cost of driving, and thus our travel behaviors. Turns out the volatility of fuel costs matters, too. Every price swing at the pump makes it harder to estimate a reliable cost of a regular commute and form a dependable budget for household car expenses.

And as planning professor Michael Smart of Rutgers shows in a new analysis, gas prices have been nothing if not volatile in recent years:

The solid top line of the chart shows real gas prices (in 2012 money) since 1979. The dotted and light lines, meanwhile, show fluctuations in those prices over 6- and 12-month windows. The massive leap that those lines have made in recent years indicates gas price volatility. In more practical terms, these lines reflect how unreliable the costs of fuel — and thus of driving — have become.

For his research, Smart paired this volatility with surveys on support for public investment in mass transit since 1984. His models revealed a connection between this support (as shown through agreement with a statement that “We are spending too little on mass transportation”) and the variance in gas prices. Meanwhile, the models found no such link between support and real gas price.

So it wasn’t cost per gallon that got us thinking more positively about public transit, it was the dizzying leaps and dives. When gas volatility was low, respondents displayed a 37 percent likelihood of stating support for transit investment. When volatility was high, that likelihood grew to 46 percent:

What’s happening, Smart believes, is that rapid fuel-cost fluctuations inspire support for transit as a means to buffer price shocks in the future. Drivers might not head for the train or the bus at the first sign of wild gas price swings, but they take some comfort in knowing that if the swings ever get too wild, they could. With that in mind, Smart encourages public officials trying to drum up support for transit to highlight the stability of transit fares, not just their low cost.

Now for the caveats. This research tracked stated support for transit investment on a survey — not actual ridership swings, not even a call to a local representative. In that sense, even the highest support figure seems a bit low; to paraphrase the famous Onion headline, just about everyone favors public transit for others.

Still, the larger point about transit incentives and car disincentives remains. Cities can and should invest in balanced transport networks with high-quality alternatives to driving. But until the cost of taking a car becomes much higher or much more unstable, those efforts are likely to go largely unnoticed.

Top image: High school senior, Kaylen Gordon, 18, left, waits for a Metro Rail light train on the Gold Line at Union Station in Los Angeles Monday, March 10, 2014. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

(Article: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2014/03/gas-prices-fluctuate-support-mass-transit-rises/8616/)

Will a cut in transit benefits change your commute habits? – From Washington Post

Could a cut in the federal transit benefit mean more cars on area roads? No one is yet certain, but this piece by The Post’s Paul Duggan  takes a good hard look at the financial impact on riders, many of them federal employees who receive the monthly transit subsidy. While elected officials have voiced support for raising the federal transit benefit for public transportation (it went up this year for parking), it could take a bit of time as Congress quibbles over larger budget matters.

(Robert Thomson / The Washington Post)

As of Jan. 1, the subsidy designed to encourage federal workers to take public transportation dropped to $130 from $245.

Stephen Crim, an urban planner with Arlington County government, ran the numbers to see how much commuters who previously received the benefit would have to pay under the new amount.

According to Crim’s report, when the maximum direct transit subsidy was $245, the typical worker exiting at the Pentagon station paid nothing out of pocket for Metro fares each month unless he or she commuted from Rockville or Shady Grove. On average, for workers headed from those two stations to Pentagon, the monthly, out-of-pocket expense was $17 and $1, respectively.

But the reduction would mean that workers traveling to Pentagon from one of 44 stations could find themselves paying as much as $116 a month out of pocket. Those coming from Rockville, for example, would pay $132 more; those from Glenmont, $106; and those from Vienna, $88.

The reduction also has Metro officials concerned. In 2012, when the transit subsidy fell to $125 amid a spending fight on Capitol Hill, ridership declined by nearly 3 percent. The result? A $9.5 million revenue loss, the transit agency said. Forty percent of Metro’s peak period travelers are federal employees whose rides are subsidized.

Not sure how the reductions will affect your out-of-pocket costs? Try this handy tool for calculating what the change will mean for you.

 

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/dr-gridlock/wp/2014/01/13/will-a-cut-in-transit-benefits-change-your-commute-habits/